prolost

vivere est cogitare

Tag: hippocampus

we call them npcs

The continued occupation of Iraq costs this nation at least $16m every hour.

Dayer AG et al. Recruiting new neurons from the subventricular zone to the rat postnatal cortex: an organotypic slice culture model. Eur J Neurosci (2008) vol. 27 pp. 1051-1060

The above is a cool article because it suggests that adult neurogenesis has the potential for clinical application. Not that it hasn’t been suggested elsewhere, but this is one of the more promising approaches.

Curtis et al. Human neuroblasts migrate to the olfactory bulb via a lateral ventricular extension. Science (2007) vol. 315 (5816) pp. 1243-9

It’s kind of surprising that it was only demonstrated in 2007 that humans have an RMS (i.e. we generate new olfactory neurons). Adult neurogenesis in both the SVZ (destined for the olfactory bulb) and the SGZ (destined for the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus), though especially the latter, has been linked in numerous studies to memory and learning.

genesis

Note: this post is obsolete; it referred originally to my old blog.

Søren Kierkegaard’s doctoral thesis, Om Begrebet Ironi med stadigt Hensyn til Socrates, was the inspiration behind the title.

I hope to capture something of art, science, and life. I’m actually not entirely sure what that statement even means, but nevertheless I will probably fail miserably (and with any luck, spectacularly).

Regarding the URL. There is overwhelming evidence that neurogenesis occurs in two areas of the adult mammalian brain – the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone; neurons produced in the latter region reach the olfactory bulb via the rostral migratory stream. Evidence of adult neurogenesis in other regions of the brain is not as clear. “Neurogenesis” was taken so I had to settle for “neurogenetic.”

Two solid review articles (the titles are self-explanatory):

Abrous et al. Adult neurogenesis: from precursors to network and physiology. Physiol Rev (2005) vol. 85 (2) pp. 523-69

Ehninger et al. Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus. Cell Tissue Res (2008) vol. 331 (1) pp. 243-50

Tonight the Seattle Opera closes its production of Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci. The two-act opera is best known (and to some, only known) for the aria Vesti la giubba. Enrico Caruso does the best Canio, particularly when it comes to this aria. There is no substitute. However, his No! Pagliaccio non son is not as good as the former. Something about Vesti la giubba is just so well suited to his voice.

It’s not snowing.