prolost

vivere est cogitare

Tag: caruso

maybe i’m just an elitist

For some reason, when I saw the previews for last night’s episode of America’s Got Talent, I thought the American version of the opera singer dude would actually be good. Alas, just like Mr. Potts, he was okay but really not all that good. A decent performance and much better than anything I could muster, but far from any standard that would be applied to a professional tenor.

Of course any such comparison is ludicrous, but the fact is that people have made comparisons between Paul Potts and real opera tenors. I’ve seen remarks about how “emotional” his singing is. That’s nice, but good tenors are emotional and have good technical skills. The technique of Potts and Boyd just really don’t stand up to scrutiny.

And what is it about Nessun dorma? Seriously, can’t you come up with something more technically challenging, that will demonstrate your ability a little better? The only reason that aria is popular is because Pavarotti made it so. Hell, they even repeat his inserted syllable in “vincero” (probably without realizing it). There are plenty of beautiful, challenging arias out there.

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clowns

While Antonello Palombi delivered a wonderful Canio, it has become rather apparent to me that there is a reason why the legendary tenors are so well known. As emotional and powerful of a performance as Palombi gave, there is no voice like Caruso’s. Domingo’s Canio ranks up there, along with possibly Lanza or Di Stefano, but I still maintain that Caruso’s performance was the best.

Palombi was good though.

Also, annoyingly enough, Bagley, et al (2007) report that “adult-generated neurons express markers of all major subtypes of neurons in the GLL and GCL.” Great. Oh and NeuN doesn’t mark all neurons in the GLL. I’ve never even heard of Neurotrace.

genesis

Note: this post is obsolete; it referred originally to my old blog.

Søren Kierkegaard’s doctoral thesis, Om Begrebet Ironi med stadigt Hensyn til Socrates, was the inspiration behind the title.

I hope to capture something of art, science, and life. I’m actually not entirely sure what that statement even means, but nevertheless I will probably fail miserably (and with any luck, spectacularly).

Regarding the URL. There is overwhelming evidence that neurogenesis occurs in two areas of the adult mammalian brain – the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone; neurons produced in the latter region reach the olfactory bulb via the rostral migratory stream. Evidence of adult neurogenesis in other regions of the brain is not as clear. “Neurogenesis” was taken so I had to settle for “neurogenetic.”

Two solid review articles (the titles are self-explanatory):

Abrous et al. Adult neurogenesis: from precursors to network and physiology. Physiol Rev (2005) vol. 85 (2) pp. 523-69

Ehninger et al. Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus. Cell Tissue Res (2008) vol. 331 (1) pp. 243-50

Tonight the Seattle Opera closes its production of Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci. The two-act opera is best known (and to some, only known) for the aria Vesti la giubba. Enrico Caruso does the best Canio, particularly when it comes to this aria. There is no substitute. However, his No! Pagliaccio non son is not as good as the former. Something about Vesti la giubba is just so well suited to his voice.

It’s not snowing.